Event Advisory: See the world’s deadliest creature live at the Toronto Eaton Centre for Plan Canada’s Spread the Net campaign for malaria awareness

TORONTO, June 1, 2015 – It’s no secret that summer is mosquito season in Canada. Here, mosquitoes are generally considered a nuisance but did you know that the mosquito is actually the world’s deadliest creature?

Malaria-infected mosquitoes lead to the deaths of nearly 600,000 people each year. This amounts to more deaths than snakes, sharks, bears or crocodiles.

Join Plan Canada on June 5 to see a wall of live mosquitoes on display at the Toronto Eaton Centre for Plan’s Spread the Net campaign (don’t worry – they’re contained!), learn about how deadly they can be and how something as simple as a bed net can save lives.

When: Friday, June 5, 2015
Photo/Interview opp: 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Mosquito display will be on site from 10:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

Who: Adam Graham, Senior Program Manager, Plan Canada
Jim Lovisek, Mosquito Wrangler

Where: Toronto Eaton Centre’s MAC Court (lower level next to the fountain and Starbucks)
220 Yonge Street, Toronto, ON

Visuals: A large display of live mosquitoes, contained and shielded by a life-saving bed net to generate awareness of malaria and Plan Canada’s Spread the Net campaign.

To speak with one of our experts;
RSVP: Jennifer Ouellette, Jennifer.Ouellette@hkstrategies.ca, 416-413-4774

Background and details:

Malaria is a preventable disease transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Although it is preventable and treatable, nearly half of the world’s population – 3.2 billion people – are at risk of malaria. Malaria disproportionately affects children due to their underdeveloped immune systems – taking the life of a child every 60 seconds.

Plan Canada’s Spread the Net is a national campaign designed to educate, motivate and inspire Canadians to raise awareness and funds for malaria-preventing bed nets in Africa.

Since 2007, Spread the Net has protected the lives of more than 7.2 million people including children and pregnant women and delivered more than 2.5 million malaria-preventing bed nets to families in Africa.

Canadians can help. For a donation of $10 to Plan’s Spread the Net campaign, one bed net can protect two people for up to three years. Thousands of lives could be saved every year if all children under the age of five in Africa slept under a bed net.

About Spread the Net

Spread the Net is a Plan Canada initiative designed to motivate, educate and inspire Canadians to help end preventable malaria deaths by raising funds and awareness to support the purchase and distribution of bed nets, along with training on their use, to children and their families in Africa. Spread the Net was founded in 2006 by Belinda Stronach, P.C., and Rick Mercer, and was acquired by Plan Canada in July 2013. Visit spreadthenet.ca for more information.

About Plan Canada and the Because I am a Girl initiative

Founded in 1937, Plan is one of the world’s oldest and largest international development agencies, working in partnership with millions of people around the world to end global poverty. Not for profit, independent and inclusive of all faiths and cultures, Plan has only one agenda: to improve the lives of children. Because I am a Girl is Plan’s global initiative to end gender inequality, promote girls’ rights and lift millions of girls – and everyone around them – out of poverty. Visit plancanada.ca and becauseiamagirl.ca for more information.

Find out more

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Media contacts

Angie Torres-Ramos, Plan Canada
T: 416-920-1654 ext. 244 | atorres@plancanada.ca

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About Plan International

Plan International is a global movement for change, mobilizing millions of people around the world to support social justice for children in developing countries.


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